Journalism

Africa inspired- TEDxRhodesU breaks new ground 

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The Tedx RhodesU team headed by Tyron Louw. Photo:Melite Vivier

For over 25 years, millions of people all over the world have been inspired and transformed by TED Talks, made available for free online via TED.com. This has inspired communities and individuals all around the world to do the same, organising independent events called TEDx ‒ Technology, Entertainment and Design ‒ with the x signifying that the event is independently organised.

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Journalism

Exploring Reza de Wet’s dreamscape

Reza de wet

During this year’s Graduation weekend, the wider Rhodes University community are in for a rare treat ‒ a mixed-media, multicultural, and many-faceted response to the work of renowned playwright, Reza de Wet.

Drifting features an eclectic mix of senior postgraduate students and professional performers, with choreography by Juanita Finestone-Praeg and Athina Vahla, design by the new head of Design at the Drama Department, Illka Louw and performances by Andrew Buckland and Levern Botha.

 

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Journalism

‘Old but still kiff’ ‒Buckland lauded for lifetime contribution to theatre

 

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Photo: Bevan Davis

Professor Andrew Buckland has often been described as a doyen of South African theatre. This may be a hackneyed phrase- but when you look back on his varied and rich career of over 30 years, the magnitude of his contribution to the performing arts is immutable.

 

 

 

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Journalism

A Bantu in my Bathroom

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Eusebius McKaiser Photo: Anna-Karien Otto

For Eusebius McKaiser the personal is the political.

Family, race, sexuality, culture ‒ he doesn’t hesitate to highlight the connection between our lives and thorny issues that plague the public sphere. Considered as one of South Africa’s more progressive thinkers, he asked some tough questions of the audience that gathered to hear about his latest book, A Bantu in My Bathroom, on Friday afternoon.

Taking umbrage against the term ‘bantu’ had actually prompted some students to tear down a few of the posters advertising the event. Known as an iconoclast and a provocateur, McKaiser relished this reaction, promptly starting off his talk by questioning the assumption that Rhodes is perceived as being the most liberal campus in South Africa.

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